Musings of a bon vivant in Hong Kong

In It To Wynn It- a day in Macau Part 2- Mizumi

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After a short tour of the Wynn’s gorgeous suites and spa, a quick drink at Cinnebar, a peek at the Tree of Prosperity and Dragon of Fortune ‘show’ in the atrium and finally watching the Performance Lake, it was time for dinner at the Japanese restaurant Mizumi.

The fact that Mizumi is right in the middle of one of the gambling halls, (incidentally, it took me ages to find because all the gambling areas and machines look the same and it’s a bit of a maze in there!), didn’t exactly fill me with a lot of enthusiasm as I was expecting it to be some kind of pit-stop for the weary gambler. I am however, pleased to report that this establishment is nothing of the sort and comes with a masterful chef with a wealth of experience. Chef Hiroshi Kagata hails from Yonago and enchants diners with creative presentations of classical Japanese dishes.

There are seasonal appetisers every month and my appetiser for the evening was a fascinating arrangement of small dishes in these beautiful bowls. I sampled simmered sweet fish with roe, boiled edible chrysanthemum flower, deep fried minced prawn topped with roasted ginkgo nuts which was fabulous, duck with matsutake mushroom, also excellent, and ark shell with mustard vinegar miso. It’s clear that Chef Hiroshi is a man who prides himself on blending cuisine with art and his careful execution of dishes is a testament to his Kaiseki cooking skills.

The Sashimi course was a sight to behold with the uni sashimi lovingly placed on top of its shell in a martini glass and the toro and geoduck nestled in a daikon flower. I appreciated the little detail of the sprigs of shiso flowers and shiso leaf in the arrangement which made this dish so visually appealing. I confess I’m not a huge fan of uni sashimi as I struggle slightly with the texture and the intense ocean tang but this was amazingly fresh and rich. The toro was wonderfully fresh and marbly too (I’m told Mizumi’s finest ingredients are flown in from Japan twice a week).

The sushi dish with tuna roll, red snapper, shrimp and abalone was accomplished and I particularly enjoyed the red snapper.

The grilled lobster with sea urchin was the standout dish of the night, and not just because of the vivid blue dish it came in. The deliciously meaty lobster piece  was grilled to perfection and was topped with a good amount of sea urchin to intensify the lobster’s flavour. Towards the end of mouthfuls of lobster, it took on the creaminess of salty egg yolk- delectable.

The wagyu beef shabu-shabu was such a fun course. I love hot pots, no matter the size, and I gain an immense amount of satisfaction from doing a bit of DIY cooking at the table. Taking care to cook it only slightly, the  gorgeous marbled wagyu beef positively melted in my mouth.

I loved the dessert. The tofu cheescake was just divine. The calmness of the tofu was very nicely offset by the sweetness of the peeled Kyoho grape. I left the pieces of melon till last to end on a refreshing note.

Mizumi’s service was, like Wing Lei, very smooth and I was drawn to the design of the interior- a nice combination of contemporary with traditional styles with interwoven bamboo slats and clean lines. If you enjoy watching the chefs at work, there is a well-situated sushi bar in the centre of the restaurant, as well as three teppanyaki sections and a robatayaki station. Mizumi is not lacking in features!

I thoroughly enjoyed my day trip to the Wynn and I was definitely impressed by the quality of the food at Wing Lei and Mizumi. These restaurants would hold their own in Hong Kong, so if you ever pop over to Macau, do make time to visit these restaurants as they are both fantastic value for money for such high standards.

$$$$-$$$$$$$$$$

Chopstixfix rating: 4/5

Mizumi, G/F, Wynn Macau, Rua Cidade de Sintra, NAPE, Macau. Tel: +853 8986 3668

Many thanks to Wynn Macau and Weber Shandwick for the generous invite and for organising the day.

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Author: chopstixfix

Michelle Ng is a Brit born Chinese-Malaysian who has loved food since time immemorial. She is a firm believer in "Live to Eat, not Eat to Live".

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